FeelNYC´s guide to the High Line

Whether in New York this winter or during the summer this relatively known garden space is definitely something to see. You of course already recognize Central Park, Union Square and New York´s other conventional parks..  This former railway line in the West Side of Manhattan is an exciting project with more than just plants on offer.

The High Line runs through the Meatpacking District, West Chelsea and Hell’s Kitchen. These districts of West Manhattan were once primarily industrial, and were served by a railway through the road. Constructed in 1930, this railway line gained the undesirable nickname of “death avenue” after a number of problems between road traffic and rail traffic. The government even attempted hiring cowboys to ride at the front of the train with red flags to warn oncoming traffic. Obviously this didn’t work; the railway line was finally elevated.

After the line ceased to be used in 1980, much debate was given to the destruction of the line. It was only at the turn of the millennium that “Friends of the High Line” started campaigning for the line to be kept open as a public space. Architects from every corner of the globe sent designs for the space, all wanting the privilege of designing this space.

As it stands, the park is 1.6km long and runs from Gansevoort Street in the Meatpacking District to West 34th Street between 10th and 11th Avenues. There are numerous stairways leading to the park, which is open daily from 7 a.m. until 10 p.m.

The line is divided into different sectors, for example the Wildflower Field, where you can find plants that used to grow on the railway line, as well as Washington Grasslands and the Sundeck Water Feature. The main idea behind the park is sustainability; all plants are fertilised with natural matter. The park was designed in a way that there would be plants in bloom all year round!

No matter what timed of year you find yourself in NYC this year, check out the High Line

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